This cave was once shelter to a band of Outlaws

It’s known as the “Dripping Cave,” for the way the sedimentary rock seems to drip from the ceiling, and also as the “Robber’s Cave,” as it once lent its shelter to a band of outlaws, who used the cave as a “home base” from which to rob the stagecoach line passing between Los Angeles and San Diego, during the 1800’s. The historic landmark is the park’s largest rock-shelter.

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River Street Savannah & The Pirates’ House

Savannah’s recorded history begins in 1733. That’s the year General James Oglethorpe, and the 120 passengers of the good ship “Anne” landed on a bluff high along the Savannah River in February. Oglethorpe named the 13th and final American colony “Georgia” after England’s King George II. Savannah became its first city.

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Boone Hall: America’s oldest working, living Plantation

Charleston South Carolina, has been on my bucket list for ages. I always heard wonderful things about the charm, the trees, the food, and the ambiance. Even though I was only in town for two days, I managed to squeeze in plenty of mini adventures.

Located a mere 20 minutes from Zero George Street, Boone Hall Plantation is one of America’s oldest working, living plantations. Located in the Mount Pleasant suburb near Charleston, it has been open to the public for over 50 years, but its history spans more than three centuries. Given as a land grant to Major John Boone, Boone Hall was first established in 1681.

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The abandoned Scull Shoals mill village: Deep in the Oconee Forest

This is a place with a rich and colorful history. I’m talking about one of those truly Southern Places, shaped by Native American, African and European influences. The ruins sit in a complex ecosystem alongside a major river, that once fed a good-sized little town, a successful textile industry, agriculture, the exchanges of commerce and a decidedly unique public citizenry.

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An Antebellum Wonderland: Madison County, Georgia

Established in 1809, Madison is the seat and the largest town in Morgan County. Madison was incorporated in 1809 and named in honor of U.S. president James Madison, who negotiated a treaty with nearby Creek Indians. Many of the town’s original settlers had received land grants in the region as compensation for their service during the American Revolution (1775-83). The early town flourished as a stagecoach stop, and an in-town residence for planters’ families. Described before the War as “The most cultured and aristocratic town on the stagecoach route from Charleston to New Orleans”, Madison has been welcoming visitors from around the world for almost two centuries.

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Bonaventure Cemetery Savannah Georgia

Calling them gravestones simply does not do them justice. Many of the grave markers at Bonaventure Cemetery are true works of art. Sculptors worked for untold hours creating these beautiful statues and monuments. Bonaventure is more than a simple cemetery; it is an outdoor sculpture garden that has few rivals in the country.

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The haunted & dangerous grounds of the Magnolia Plantation

Magnolia-Plantation-And-Gardens-30599The world-famous Magnolia Plantation has been associated with the Drayton family since it’s founding in 1676. The plantation has survived the centuries and has been part of the history of our nation through the American Revolution, the Civil War and beyond. It’s also the oldest plantation site on the Ashley River.

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